NYSVMS Updates

Veterinary eNews 9/23/21

  

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New York State Veterinary Medical Society

Issue Date: 9/23/21

NYSVMS holding annual business meeting October 2 during NYS-VC

NYSVMS

NYSVMS and Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine are hosting the NYS-VC October 1-3 virtually at All active NYSVMS members-join NYSVMS at our Annual Business Meeting Sunday, October 3 from 12:30-1:15pm to receive an update on this year’s business. Every member who attends will be entered into a drawing to receive a one year membership to NYSVMS (state dues only)–free dues in 2022! If you plan on joining the fun and free Online Office Games networking event Friday, October 1st at 5:15 p.m. please fill out this by September 28th.

In this issue...
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NYSVMS recruiting for class of 2022 Power of 10

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AVMA backs legislation promoting new pet safety requirements for xylitol

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Help evaluate veterinary medical colleges with AVMA COE

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Longtime, loyal client leaves entire estate to Cornell University Hospital for Animals

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A group effort leads to a cure for lab with lymphoma

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A seminal study: Dr. Paula Cohen and colleagues embark on multi-institutional NIH grant to analyze sperm development

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Managing equine foot pain

NYSVMS recruiting for class of 2022 Power of 10

NYSVMS

NYSVMS is currently recruiting for the Power of 10 class of 2022. This is a national initiative designed to cultivate leadership capacity in grads 15 years or less from veterinary school who are current NYSVMS members and provide learning experiences that will enrich the individual and benefit the individual’s practice, community and profession. The program provides NYSVMS members with 4 leadership development sessions. NYSVMS provides the experts and covers all meeting and travel expenses for participants to attend sessions. The topics were: compassion fatigue, setting boundaries, what to do when OPD knocks on your door, restructuring student debt and financial planning. The hope for 2022 is for some of these programs will be held in person. Applications for the Power of 10 Class of 2022 are currently being accepted now through December 1st. For more information, please contact Stephanie Quirini at .

AVMA backs legislation promoting new pet safety requirements for xylitol

AVMA

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) today issued its full endorsement of the Paws Off Act of 2021, which would require food containing the sugar substitute xylitol to include a warning label specifying its toxic effects. Xylitol is a substance that is highly poisonous to pets, especially dogs. Xylitol, the artificial sweetener used in everyday products, is frequently not listed on the ingredient label, making it difficult for pet owners to keep track of what items are dangerous to their pets. Most often found in sugar-free gum and breath mints, xylitol may also be present in vitamins, cough drops, sugar-free desserts, mouthwash, toothpaste, and other household items. The Paws Off Act would help inform pet owners about the products that contain the artificial sweetener in order to keep their pets safe.

Help evaluate veterinary medical colleges with AVMA COE

AVMA

The AVMA Council on Education® (AVMA COE®) will accept applications beginning December 15, 2021, from veterinarians interested in serving as COE site visitors. Site visitors conduct veterinary medical college accreditation site visits on behalf of the AVMA COE. These volunteers review a college’s self-study, verify the information during a comprehensive visit at the college, and submit a report to the AVMA COE. Site visitors make recommendations to the COE but do not attend council meetings, discuss findings, or otherwise participate in accreditation decisions.

Longtime, loyal client leaves entire estate to Cornell University Hospital for Animals

Cornell University CVM

Norman Nolan was well-known as a loyal client of Cornell University Hospital for Animals (CUHA). When he passed away at age 95 in April of 2021, he surprised many with his generosity, leaving all his remaining money and assets to the hospital and the patients it serves. “Mr. Nolan’s generosity to staff, faculty, students and fellow clients during his lifetime can now be acknowledged more publicly and will provide critical help to others in need,” says Amy L. Robinson, director of client and family giving.

A group effort leads to a cure for lab with lymphoma

Cornell University CVM

When Lorna Welde’s beloved black lab Galaxie developed golf ball size lumps all over his body literally overnight, she told her kids to set their alarms for 4 a.m. so they could get their pup to Cornell University Hospital for Animals (CUHA) — a three-and-a-half-hour drive from their home in Brewster, New York — first thing in the morning. “I didn't even think about it twice,” Welde says. “My first thought was I'll take him to Cornell and whatever it is, they'll have what we need to figure it out and treat him as quickly and completely as possible.”

A seminal study: Dr. Paula Cohen and colleagues embark on multi-institutional NIH grant to analyze sperm development

Cornell University CVM

Male infertility is on the rise, with significant declines in sperm quantity and quality occurring across the human population worldwide in the past two decades. The reason for this is poorly understood, and scientists suspect spermatogenesis, the process of how sperm develops, is a crucial piece in this puzzle. Dr. Paula Cohen, professor of genetics at the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) and associate vice provost for life sciences at Cornell, is leading the effort to solve this puzzle. Thanks to a multi-center, $8M+ grant from the NIH National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, Cohen and her collaborators will untangle the complex genetic rulebook for making sperm, while also looking for hidden causes of infertility related to spermatogenesis.

Managing equine foot pain

The Horse

For a horse to perform at his best, his musculoskeletal system must be strong and pain-free. Hooves are especially important parts of this equation. Feet can be painful for a variety of reasons, from the simplest bruise or an abscess to more critical concerns such as issues with the navicular bone and associated structures, a condition now referred to as podotrochlosis, or laminitis, which is when the tissues supporting the coffin bone within the hoof wall become inflamed and potentially fail.

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