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Veterinary eNews 2/24/22

  

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Issue Date: 2/24/22

LIU CVM students winners in the AVMA Animal Welfare Assessment Contest

LIU CVM

Long Island University (LIU) CVM students won 1st place and 2nd place in the AVMA's Animal Welfare Assessment Contest (AWJAC). The Animal Welfare Assessment Contest (AWJAC) aims to provide a unique educational experience while strengthening student vocabulary and reasoning skills. The competition teaches students to assess the welfare of animals in a variety of settings using science-based methods and reasoning. Students are given the opportunity to weigh evidence and present sound evaluations. This contest ensures that tomorrow's leaders in the animal industries develop strong communication skills and acquire enhanced knowledge of animal welfare. LIU CVM students won 1st place for the Veterinary Student Group Category and Tannaz Zafarnia won 1st place and Magnus Yoshimura won 2nd place in the Veterinary Student Individual Category.

In this issue...
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$12M grant establishes Duffield Institute for Animal Behavior

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Urgent care for pets: Bond Vet launching northeast expansion

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USDA awards $7.5M for loan repayment to address shortage areas

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Swine farms vary in their risk from endemic PED

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Drug for human overdoses treats sea turtles with brevetoxicosis

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Managing equine foot pain

$12M grant establishes Duffield Institute for Animal Behavior

Cornell University CVM

Thanks to a new $12.1 million grant from the Dave & Cheryl Duffield Foundation, the College of Veterinary Medicine is launching a new institute focused on companion animal behavior that will serve as a one-of-a-kind resource for veterinarians and pet owners nationwide. The Duffield Institute for Animal Behavior will build on the college’s globally recognized academic, research, clinical and outreach programs to advance understanding of animal behavior and well-being – with the ultimate goal of improving the lives of companion animals and their caretakers.

Urgent care for pets: Bond Vet launching northeast expansion

Forbes

Bond Vet, a chain of walk-in veterinary offices that provides urgent care for cats and dogs, is preparing to double in size this year, and expand its territory, with openings in the Boston and Washington D.C. metro areas. Bond Vet is growing as a number of competitors, ranging from the biggest pet retailers to small startups, are all trying to grab a piece of the lucrative pet healthcare market. It is targeting the metropolitan millennial pet parent who is looking for a quick and convenient place to get help for an ailing dog or cat.

USDA awards $7.5M for loan repayment to address shortage areas

AVMA

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Jan. 12 that it made awards totaling $7.5 million to 78 veterinarians in 2021 toward repayment of veterinary student loans in return for service in shortage areas in food animal practice or public practice. The USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture made the awards through the federal Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program. The VMLRP pays up to $25,000 per year towards repayment of educational loans of veterinarians who agree to serve in a NIFA-designated veterinary shortage situation for a period of three years.

Swine farms vary in their risk from endemic PED

AVMA

Recent analysis indicates the counties with more swine farms are more likely to have outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea. An article published in January by National Hog Farmer notes that the PED virus has become endemic in the U.S. The overall number of cases has been declining since the virus emerged in U.S. swine herds in 2013, and the risk of outbreaks today varies by region of the country, season, and number of swine in the area, it states.

Drug for human overdoses treats sea turtles with brevetoxicosis

DVM360

A recent research paper1 published by the Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from Loggerhead Marinelife Center (LMC) has revealed that therapy used to treat human drug overdoses—intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE)—is effective in treating sea turtles suffering from toxic red tide exposure. According to an organizational release,2 red tides are caused by an algal species that discharges potent neurotoxins, known as brevetoxins, into encompassing water. Brevetoxins bind to fats and exposure to the toxins results in neurological symptoms in impacted animals such as muscle spasming and disorientation. This process causes mass strandings and the deaths of various marine animals, including sea turtles.

Managing equine foot pain

The Horse

For a horse to perform at his best, his musculoskeletal system must be strong and pain-free. Hooves are especially important parts of this equation. Feet can be painful for a variety of reasons, from the simplest bruise or an abscess to more critical concerns such as issues with the navicular bone and associated structures, a condition now referred to as podotrochlosis, or laminitis, which is when the tissues supporting the coffin bone within the hoof wall become inflamed and potentially fail.

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