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Veterinary eNews 3/3/22

  

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Issue Date: 3/3/22

March NYSVMS free CE online programs available!

NYSVMS

Each month NYSVMS makes available new CE online programs for free from our partner VetBloom to our members and their LVTs. The March programs have launched! They are: Stayin Alive!: CPR in Veterinary Medicine; The Shocking Truth! A Guide to Understanding and Treating the Patient in Shock; Thermoregulation in the ICU: To Treat or not to Treat? and Case Presentations in Small Animal Neurology - Part 3 (Vestibular System & Cerebellum).

In this issue...
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FDA seeks details on antimicrobial use, resistance in companion animals

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Ways to help Ukrainians and their pets

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Organizations warn against hemp in pet food, livestock feed

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USDA’s NIFA 2022 Veterinary Services Grant Program applications open

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Student honored with entrepreneurial fellowship

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Deadly botulism outbreak confirmed in Florida

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Ultrasound and sMRI imaging of the equine foot compared

FDA seeks details on antimicrobial use, resistance in companion animals

AVMA

Food and Drug Administration officials want help collecting data on how antimicrobial administration to companion animals affects development of drug resistance. A Feb. 15 announcement from the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine indicates the FDA needs to better understand how drug use in animals such as dogs, cats, and horses might impact antimicrobial resistance in pathogens of animals and people.

Ways to help Ukrainians and their pets

The Dodo

As hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians flee their country, many are refusing to leave without their pets by their side. Across social media, photos have popped up of people and their animals attempting uncertain border crossings or huddling in bomb shelters and subway stations. According to recent reports, Poland, Romania and Slovakia are allowing Ukrainians to bring pets across borders without veterinary paperwork. However, there are still many animals in Ukraine in need of food, medicine and care. Heroic volunteers and shelter workers are staying behind in the face of missile strikes to care for these homeless animals.

Organizations warn against hemp in pet food, livestock feed

AVMA

Veterinary, feed industry, and animal and public safety leaders are warning against feeding animals hemp products until studies show it’s safe. In a February letter to agriculture leaders and state policymakers, the Association of American Feed Control Officials and 16 co-signing organizations—including the AVMA—expressed concerns about the risks to animals and trade of feeding animals unproven products containing hemp. Those concerns relate to feeding pets, horses, and livestock hemp and hemp products such as hemp seed and hemp seed oil.

USDA’s NIFA 2022 Veterinary Services Grant Program applications open

USDA

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Veterinary Services Grant Program (VSGP) announces the opening of the fiscal year (FY) 2022 application cycle. NIFA anticipates that approximately $3 million in funding will be available in FY 2022 to help mitigate food animal veterinary service shortages in the United States. The goals of the VSGP are to support food animal veterinary medicine through Education, Extension, and Training (EET) funds for accredited schools and organizations and through Rural Practice Enhancement (RPE) funds for veterinary clinics that provide services in veterinary shortage situations. A total of 228 veterinarian shortage situations are designated for FY 2022 for RPE applicants. The displays all shortage situation designations for FY 2022. The VSGP is now available. The deadline for VSGP applications is Tuesday, April 5, 2022 at 5:00 P.M. EST.

Student honored with entrepreneurial fellowship

Cornell University CVM

Michelle Greenfield, DVM Class of 2023, has received an award from Entrepreneurship at Cornell that will allow her to work on her company, Equilibrate, this summer. Equilibrate focuses on high-capacity sensors that transmit data on horse weight so that horse owners can better manage a horse’s husbandry and medical care. The sensors send Bluetooth data to a smart phone app, where owners can routinely monitor trends.

Deadly botulism outbreak confirmed in Florida

The Horse

The tragic thing about equine botulism is that horses might die from it before it’s ever diagnosed—or, in areas where it’s uncommon, even seriously suspected. That’s the case with a Florida outbreak that began earlier this month.

Ultrasound and sMRI imaging of the equine foot compared

The Horse

A recent study in Belgium compared the use of ultrasound and standing magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) to identify issues within the equine podotrochlear apparatus (the atomical features involved in what’s commonly known as navicular syndrome or disease). The researchers found the two modalities complemented each other, with ultrasound detecting more deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) lesions and sMRI showing more palmar navicular abnormalities.

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