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Veterinary eNews 3/24/22

  

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Issue Date: 3/24/22

Equine Imaging webinar Lameness of the Distal Limb April 4th

NYSVMS

Equine imaging webinar-Lameness of the Distal Limb presented by: Assaf Lerer, BSc, DVM, MSc & Jayleen Harris, DVM will be held Monday, April 4th from 6:30-8:00pm. This program will be an interactive, case reading session. Radiographic images will be provided by the presenters. The radiologists will demonstrate how they evaluate radiographs regarding technique, interpretation and case synthesis. Ample opportunity will be provided for discussion and questions. Free to SOTVMA, CATVMA, CDVMS, CNYVMA, FLVMA, GVVMA, HVVMS, LIVMA, NNYVMS, WNYVMA & WRVMA members and their LVTs (listed regions contribute to program cost.) Members of other NYSVMS regions - $15; Non-Members - $30. Attendees will receive 1.5 NYS CE credit hours.

In this issue...
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LIVMA donates aid to Ukraine animal care

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Man admits to fatally beating two puppies

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New technique yields insight into genome

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NAVTA calls for better protection of veterinary technician title

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OIE guide promotes responsible anthelmintic drug use

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Parasitic infections likely to spread in 2022, CAPC warns

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Chiropractic’s effects on lameness and back pain in horses

LIVMA donates aid to Ukraine animal care

LIVMA

LIVMA recently made a financial donation to: and . LIVMA also put together a list of places to donate to. Included below are some sites of organizations that are directly assisting animals:

; ; and

Man admits to fatally beating two puppies

Newsday

A Mineola man admitted to fatally beating two puppies and seriously injuring another that lost a leg, agreeing to a plea deal that will send him to jail for a year and ban him from having a pet. Ellie Knoller, 31, pleaded guilty to three felony charges of aggravated animal cruelty in a case that Nassau Supervising Judge Teresa Corrigan called abhorrent and horrible.

New technique yields insight into genome

Cornell University CVM

A new Cornell study sheds light on a controversial debate in epigenetics – the set of molecular changes occurring on top of the genome that regulate how genes are turned on and off, but without changing a cell’s DNA sequence. The discovery may streamline the interpretation of new genomes from less-studied animals, researchers said. Scientists studying epigenetics have long argued over the role of histone marks – little chemical tags hitched onto histones, the spool-like proteins that DNA wraps around inside the nucleus.

NAVTA calls for better protection of veterinary technician title

AVMA

In most of the U.S., anyone can call themselves a veterinary technician without penalty. Ashli R. Selke, a credentialed veterinary technician, said many licensed technicians feel undervalued and disrespected by misuse of the title, as though their work toward their education was in vain. Selke is president of the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America, which published a report in February that indicates the veterinary practice acts for 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rick lack restrictions on who can use the title “veterinary technician,” whether because they do not define the title or they do not specify who can use it.

The NYSVMS Executive Board at their last meeting approved a relating to the term veterinary nurse.

OIE guide promotes responsible anthelmintic drug use

AVMA

Guidance published recently describes the dangers of resistance to deworming drugs and the ways people responsible for animal care can help preserve drug effectiveness. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) is providing the document, “Responsible and Prudent Use of Anthelmintic Chemicals to Help Control Anthelmintic Resistance in Grazing Livestock Species” (PDF). The guidance contains messages on how veterinarians, animal owners and caretakers, and governmental authorities can help protect animal health and welfare through careful drug administration.

Parasitic infections likely to spread in 2022, CAPC warns

AVMA

Heartworm, Lyme disease, and other parasitic infections of pets continue spreading in the U.S. The Companion Animal Parasite Council predicts more widespread distribution of heartworm and Lyme disease among pets in the U.S. in 2022 as well as increased spread of ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. This year’s edition of the organization’s annual pet parasite forecasts warns of worsening conditions for pets across much of the country.

Chiropractic’s effects on lameness and back pain in horses

The Horse

Lameness is one of the most common causes of reduced performance in equine athletes. As such, veterinarians and researchers have devoted a significant amount of time to diagnosing and treating various causes of lameness. “One of these modalities is chiropractic care, which has been increasing in prevalence in a veterinary setting, is affordable to the majority of our veterinary clients, and has been used for the treatment of back pain in horses,” said Samantha Parkinson, DVM, a veterinary resident in equine field service in Colorado State University’s (CSU) Department of Clinical Sciences, in Fort Collins.

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