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Veterinary eNews 3/31/22

  

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Issue Date: 3/31/22

Integrative medicine webinar: The prevention and treatment of respiratory disease in calves April 7th

NYSVMS

Presented by Nancy Martin, DVM, CVA, the integrative medicine webinar: The prevention and treatment of respiratory disease in calves will be held on Thursday, April 7th from 7-8pm. This webinar is free to NYSVMS members and their LVTs and will earn 1 NYS CE credit. Herbal medications were relied upon to treat human and animal disease states until the mid-20th century. Many veterinary practitioners are again finding success using botanical medications in small animal and companion animal practice where diseased individuals can be handled and treated twice daily for the amount of time necessary to restore health. The use of herbal formulations in these cases makes it possible to avoid contributing to the growing problem and likely the next pandemic, of antimicrobial resistance. Can herbal medicines be used to restore health in livestock production?

In this issue...
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2022 Parasite forecast: Heartworm, Lyme, higher-than-average risk

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New study defines spread of SARS-CoV-2 in white-tailed deer

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Correcting night blindness in dogs

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Genetically modified cattle may be sold for food in U.S.

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World Veterinary Day 2022 focuses on strengthening veterinary resilience

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COVID’s impacts, for better and worse, on the horse world

2022 Parasite forecast: Heartworm, Lyme, higher-than-average risk

AAHA

The Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) predicts that instances of heartworm disease will be higher than average through 2022, particularly along the Atlantic coast and Mississippi River. That’s according to the CAPC’s 2022 Annual Pet Parasite Forecast. Additionally, Lyme disease will continue its geographic expansion southward and westward, with Michigan and portions of Ohio expected to be particularly high-risk “hot spots.”

New study defines spread of SARS-CoV-2 in white-tailed deer

Cornell University CVM

North American white-tailed deer – shown in 2021 surveys of five states to have SARS-CoV-2 infection rates of up to 40% – shed and transmit the virus for up to five days once infected, according to a new study. “It’s a relatively short window of time in which the infected animals are shedding and are able to transmit the virus,” said Dr. Diego Diel, associate professor in the Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences and director of the Virology Laboratory at the College of Veterinary Medicine’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center.

Correcting night blindness in dogs

Penn Today

People with congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) are unable to distinguish objects in dim-light conditions. This impairment presents challenges, especially where artificial lighting is unavailable or when driving at night. In 2015, researchers from Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine learned that dogs could develop a form of inherited night blindness with strong similarities to the condition in people. In 2019, the team identified the gene responsible.

Genetically modified cattle may be sold for food in U.S.

AVMA

Cattle that are genome edited to grow short, slick hair are the first genetically modified cattle that U.S. authorities will allow to be raised for food. Food and Drug Administration officials announced March 7 that they found no safety concerns related to the modified Angus cattle, and meat from descendants of those cattle could be available in the U.S. and other countries within two years. Though intentional genetic modifications are subject to FDA regulation as drugs, agency officials said the low-risk determination let them apply enforcement discretion and allow production of the cattle without an application for drug approval.

World Veterinary Day 2022 focuses on strengthening veterinary resilience

AVMA

Veterinarians need tools and support to maintain their personal health and wellness, according to the announcement for World Veterinary Day 2022. The event falls on April 30 this year, and the theme is “Strengthening veterinary resilience.” The World Veterinary Association created World Veterinary Day in 2000 as an annual celebration of the veterinary profession, taking place on the last Saturday of April. Since 2019, the WVA has partnered with Health for Animals, the global animal health industry association, on the World Veterinary Day Award, which honors one WVA member’s activities related to the theme.

COVID’s impacts, for better and worse, on the horse world

The Horse

The COVID-19 pandemic has made things better for some horses and worse for others. Yet the bond between humans and their horses is stronger—and more important—than ever, says Clara Ann Mason, DVM, who operates an ambulatory equine practice in Winfield, West Virginia.

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